Consignment realignment: Operation moving on to bigger things

Royann Mallory, left, and Kim Leyerly own the Encore Shoppe, a Grand Junction consignment store that carries a variety of merchandise. The  two expect to soon move the operation into a former City Market store on First Street. (Business Times photo by Phil Castle)
Royann Mallory, left, and Kim Leyerly own the Encore Shoppe, a Grand Junction consignment store that carries a variety of merchandise. The two expect to soon move the operation into a former City Market store on First Street. (Business Times photo by Phil Castle)

Phil Castle, The Business Times

Royann Mallory and Kim Leyerly look forward to moving their Grand Junction consignment store to a location that offers far more room not only for merchandise, but also parking.

“I can’t wait to be over there,” said Mallory, who owns the Encore Shoppe with Leyerly, her business partner and daughter.

The two are in the midst of refurbishing the former City Market at 1909 N. First St. in preparation for the re-opening of the Encore Shoppe there set for March 1.

Once the work is finished, the store will sport new paint and flooring as well as 10 new dressing rooms, Leyerly said.

At 23,000 square feet, the old grocery store offers more than double the total retail space of the present location of the Encore Shoppe divided between a main floor and basement in a building at 461 Grand Ave.
The new location has only one floor, offering easier access to customers in wheelchairs and those with physical limitations.

There’s also room in what used to a pharmacy for a coffee shop Mallory and Leyerly hope to eventually open here.

Moreover, the First Street location will offer ample parking, solving yet another problem, they said.

Mallory and Leyerly both have worked at the Encore Shoppe since they were teen-agers. They became owners in 2011 and since have expanded the operation. “We’ve just been rocking and rolling ever since,” Leyerly said.

The Encore Shoppe carries a variety of merchandise, including clothing and accessories as well as housewares, linens furniture and antiques.

The store sells merchandise on a consignment basis, paying owners 40 percent of the sales price of items priced under $100 and 50 percent on items over $100. Owners can take the money or credit for their own purchases.

The consignment store offers people a way to make money on things they no longer want or use, Leyerly said. “You never know how much money you have in your closet until you clean it out.”

Mallory said they’ve been successful because they offer a range or merchandise that appeals to a broad base of customers. “We have a little bit for everyone.”

Moreover, the inventory changes nearly every day, she added. “It’s the variety that keeps people coming back.”

Mallory and Leyerly said the new location will offer even more and a greater variety of inventory on the inside along with more parking on the outside.